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Destinations - Namibia

Khomas Region - Windhoek
At an elevation of 1650 metres, Windhoek lies in a beautiful valley and is surrounded by the Eros Mountains in the north and the Auas mountains to the south. The Namibian capital, Windhoek, is located in the centre of the country. It consists of a blend of African and European cultures with friendly locals. Namibia gained independence in 1990, it has since been characterized as having a good sense of freedom and pride in itself. The city offers you a myriad of sightseeing opportunities, entertainment options and some of the best and truly glamorous hotels for you to stay in while reveling at this fascinating city’s beauty. Even though it is the capital the city is home to approximately 300 000+ people. It is a delightful mix of old and new. Bustling curio and informal markets trade in the shadow of modern high-rise buildings; historic forts and castles overlook the city.
 
 
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Karas Region / Hardap Region - Mariental - Keetmanshoop - Quivertree Forest - "Giants Playground"
Mariental - named by local Rheinish (German Lutheran) missionaries after Maria the wife of the first colonial settler of the area Herman Brandt, Mariental was founded in 1912 as a railway stop between Windhoek and Keetmanshoop. It was proclaimed a town in 1920 and a municipality in 1946 Hardap Dam is a dam close to Mariental, Hardap Region, Namibia. Created in 1962 while Namibia was under South African occupation, Hardap Dam is the largest dam in the country. The reservoir dams the Fish River and has a surface area of 25 km². It provides water for irrigation, making possible to cultivate animal fodder, as well as corn, fruits and vegetables. The town is surrounded by flourishing commercial farms which, due to the low annual rainfall in the area focus on game farming as well as sheep and ostrich farming which along with cattle farming remain popular in the region. Export grapes, cotton lucern and dairy farming is also sustained by irrigation from the Hardap Dam. Keetmanshoop - Before the colonial era, the settlement was known as ?Nu?goaes or Swartmodder, both of which mean "Black Marsh" and indicated the presence of a spring in the area. The first white settler, Guilliam Visagie, arrived here in 1785. When in February 1850 the Kharo!oan clan (Keetmanshoop Nama) split from the Red Nation, the main subtribe of the Nama people, they settled permanently here. In 1860 the Rheinische Missionsgesellschaft founded a mission there to Christianize the local Nama. The first missionary, Johann Georg Schröder, arrived in Keetmanshoop on April 14, 1866, which is now marked as the founding date of Keetmanshoop. The mission station was named after the German trader and director of the Rhenish Missionary Society Johann Keetman who supported the mission financially. He never actually visited the place himself. The Keetmanshoop Museum is located in the Rhenish Mission Church, a building dating back to 1895. The church was declared an historic monument in 1978 and is a well-known landmark. Its unique combination of Gothic architecture cast in African stone makes it one of the architectural masterpieces in the country and a popular tourist attraction. Other notable buildings are the post office, dating from 1910, and the railway station building. The Museum is located in the old Mission Church, now owned by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the Republic of Namibia. It is managed by the Keetmanshoop Municipality and displays exhibits of the natural history, historical documents of the town and the Nama culture. The museum is open on weekdays from 07h30 to 12h30 and from 13h30 to 16h30. North-east of Keetmanshoop you will find the Mesosaurus Fossil Site and Quivertree Dolorite Park. The Mesosaurus is probably one of the most convincing examples to prove the drifting of continents. The same genus in the same rock formations is to be found in both southern Africa and South America. In southern Africa the fossils can be found in the Whitehill formations, while in South America they are found in the Irats Formations. The Quiver Tree Forest, a stone’s throw from Mesosaurus, is well worth a stop if you’re passing through the area. Declared a national monument in 1955, the forest protects over 300 of these unique-looking trees – many of which are hundreds of years old. The Quiver Tree (Aloe Dichotoma) is one of the most distinctive elements of the flora in Namibia and the Northern Cape, where it rises from the scrub and desert on ancient trunks with an unmistakable crown of leaves. It takes its name because the native San Bushmen used the dead hollow trunks as quivers for their arrows. Apparently dead trunks are also used as natural fridges; as the fibrous tissues cools the air as it passes through it, making it a useful storage space for meat, vegetables, and water.
 
 
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Karas Region / Hardap Region - Fish River Canyon and /Ai-/Ais Richterveld Transfrontier Park
The highlight in the far south of the country is the Fish River Canyon, one of Namibia’s most spectacular geological wonders. The canyon lies in the lower reaches of Namibia’s longest river. The Canyon is a massive 161km long and 27km wide, with a varying depth of 550m. The /Ai-/Ais Hot Springs, Fish River Canyon and the Huns Mountain complex west of the canyon were incorporated into a park to form the /Ai-/Ais Richtersveld Transfrontier Park. The /Ai/Ais-Richtersveld Transfrontier Park measures 5 920 km² and spans some of the most spectacular arid and desert mountain scenery in southern Africa. It includes the /Ai/Ais Hot Springs Game Park in Namibia and the Richtersveld Park in South Africa. The attraction of this rugged wilderness is its isolated and otherworldly landscape and wealth of interesting plants. The area is part of the Succulent Karoo biome which has the richest succulent flora in the world harbouring about one-third of the world’s approximately 10 000 succulent species, and is also one of only two entirely arid ecosystems hotspots. From Keetmanshoop take the B4 for 35 km before turning left onto the D435, past the Naute Dam and onto the C12 which leads into the park. Alternatively, stay on the B4 and continue to Seeheim, a distance of 45 km, then turn left onto the C12. The Fish River Canyon is approximately 77 km from the C12 turnoff. The ferry across the Orange River at the Sendelingsdrift Tourist Access Facility in the Richtersveld (South Africa) transports vehicles weighing less than six tons directly between the two sides of the Transfrontier Park. Rosh Pinah - Skorpion Zinc Mine is an integrated world-class mining and refinery operation located near the southern town of Rosh Pinah in Namibia. Open-cast mining and hydro-metallurgical systems are used to mine and refine zinc oxide to produce Special High Grade Zinc (SHG.) The nameplate capacity of Skorpion Zinc is 150,000 tons of SHG zinc per annum. Visit the Rosh Pinah Geo Center which is located in the small mining town of Rosh Pinah. The Geo Centre exhibits minerals and rocks from the Rosh Pinah and Skorpion Mines, as well as from the wider Namibia, information material on Geology, Mining and Processing Methods of the local mines. The Skorpion non-sulphide zinc mine in southwestern Namibia has always produced interesting and rare minerals. To name only a few amongst the great variety of zinc carbonates, phosphates and silicates discovered at Skorpion, the skorpionite, hemimorphite, smithsonite and tarbuttite crystals are probably the best known. Nevertheless, Skorpion mine has an area where copper values in the host rock are higher, and minerals like malachite, chrysocolla, zincolibethenite, wulfenite, atacamite and herbertsmithite, and on one occasion also cerussite, have occurred. Trips to geological interesting places in the vicinity of Rosh Pinah can be booked - e.g. historic Lorelei Copper mine and alluvial diamond Mine near the Orange River, as well as various other geologically and historically interesting places such as San caves and graves. Orange River - Gariep, meaning ‘Great River’, is its Nama name. The Orange River is the only perennial river in the region. It traverses almost the entire continent to end in what feels like an oasis in the desert region of the Karoo and Southern Namib. The Orange River is the longest in South Africa, starting in the Drakensberg in Lesotho, it flows westward towards the Atlantic ocean where it spills out on the border of South Africa and Namibia.
 
 
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Karas Region / Hardap Region - Lüderitzbucht - Kolmanskuppe - Sperrgebiet National Park - Tiras Mountains
Luderitz is a small town, dominated by the port and diamond mining. The sheer isolation of this town, colonial buildings, cold winds of the Atlantic Ocean and fishing boats make it unique. Luderitz was initially referred to Angra Pequena by the Portuguese in 1488. Adolf Lüderitz from Bremen landed in 1883 to establish a trading station. The Luderitz Peninsula has a varied coastline including Bogenfels (rock arch), a penguin colony and seal colonies. The Sperrgebiet National Park was proclaimed in 2008. The Sperrgebiet covers 26 000km² of important semi-desert and forms part of the Succulent Karoo biome which extends into South Africa. Visitors can visit (prior arrangement)the colossal 55 meter high Bogenfels rock arch, the modern diamond mine and ghost town Elizabeth Bay and Pomoma. Namibia's most famous ghost town of Kolmanskop, a deserted diamond mining town, is situated in the Sperrgebiet (Forbidden area - Diamond zone) just 10kms outside of Luderitz. Once rich and opulent, Kolmanskop is now a ghost town invaded by sand and lost in the middle of the Namib desert. But its history stays as short as it is surprising; founded after the discovery of diamonds by German settlers in 1908, Kolmanskop went through a real "diamond rush" and very fastly became the nerve centre of the area, due to its rich deposit of diamond. The legend says that even by night, you only had to go down to find diamonds in the sand, thanks to the moonlight.
 
 
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Karas Region / Hardap Region - Mata-Mata border post - Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park
Namibia's Kalahari Desert borders Botswana and South Africa in the south. About 150 km due east of Keetmanshoop are the western beginnings of the famous Kalahari - Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park. The total land area of the park is in the order of 37,991 km2 in extent, with 9,591 km 2 (27%) in South Africa and the remainder in Botswana. The Kalahari is a semi-arid wilderness with bright red sand dunes and covers most of Botswana and reaches into Namibia, South Africa and other African countries as well. The landscape is predominantly made up of savannah, large grasslands and small sand dunes. Most diversified is the wildlife, which populates even remote areas of the Kalahari Desert. Here, the large herds of animals are moving unlimited and freely. Kgalagadi is famous for its black-maned lions, cheetahs, leopards, meerkats and Cape and bat-eared foxes. The park offers a majestic and infinite desert landscape with migrating herds of wildebeest, gemsbok, springbok and eland, cunning predators like lion, cheetah and leopard and unending red dunes with unique flora and a diversity of epic proportions is what draws the visitor to this ancient land of the Kalahari Desert. Kgalagadi provides an alternate route when travelling between South Africa and Namibia, with an opportunity for an exciting Kalahari experience in between. Kgalagadi has become a popular destination for tourists and lovers of its 4×4 wilderness trails wishing to experience the Kalahari's tranquility. Kgalagadi was given new impetus when the presidents of Botswana, Namibia and South Africa opened the Mata-Mata tourist access facility in October 2007. This historic access point on the border of the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park and Namibia has boosted cross-border tourism, reunited local communities and enhanced job creation. It also contributes to socio-economic development, especially in the tourism sectors of the three countries. Mata Mata, serves as the border post and is open from 8:00 to 16:30. Tourists wanting to exit the park other than the point of entry must kindly note that all immigration controls must be done at Twee Rivieren / Two Rivers and a minimum of two nights stay in the South African side of the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park is required to be allowed to pass through the Mata Mata border post to and from Namibia or when entering or exiting the Park to or from Botswana. Tourists crossing into Namibia: Kindly note that the standard black and white’ ZA’ vehicle sticker is required. A road levy of R154 per trailer and R242 per vehicle is payable at Namibian immigration when entering Namibia.(All prices are subject to change without notice.) Tourists travelling from and to Namibia please acquaint yourself with the summer and winter time differences between South Africa and Namibia in order to plan accordingly. Winter changes - 1hr.the first Sunday in April until the first Sunday in September Visit the accommodations as listed below on the border to the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park and continue your travel further to South Africa. Or come back to Namibia - you'd only explored a tiny corner of Namibia, didn't you?
 
 
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Karas Region / Hardap Region - Namib Naukluft Park - Sossusvlei Dunes and Sesriem Canyon
The Namib Naukluft Park is Namibia's most versatile conservation areas and the largest conservation area in Namibia. The Namib Section is situated in the central and southern Namib Desert - portions of the Diamond Area as far south as Aus/Lüderitzbucht road were subsequently added, which has today a size of 49 768 km². One of the country's major tourist attraction are the Sossusvlei dunes. The World Heritage Site, Sossusvlei is a large ephemeral clay pan set amid spectacular red piles of sand that rank among the tallest dunes on earth. It is renowned for its majestic star-shaped dunes with their deep, warm hues an desiccated white pans, including the eerie Dead Pan/Vlei. At the entry to Sossusvlei is the Sesriem Canyon, where centuries of erosion have incised a narrow gorge about 1km in length. Sesriem derives its name from the time when early pioneers tied six lengths of raw-hide thongs together to draw water from the pools.
 
 
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Erongo Region - Swakopmund - Dorob National Park - Walvis Bay
The stretch between Sandwich Harbour (south of Walvis Bay)and the Ugab River was proclaimed as the Dorob National Park in 2008. It is recognized, that a balance needs to be found between conserving the environment and providing citizens and tourists with an opportunity to enjoy off-road recreational vehicle activities. The Namibian Coastline is a haven for countless unique plants, animals and birds. Over a hundred lichen species haven been recorded in the Namib Desert, which are very fragile and will take decades to grow back if damaged Swakopmund resembles a small German town and creates a feeling of timelessness with its palm-lined streets, seaside promenades, restaurants, cafes, art galleries and museums. And while there’s plenty to do within the city limits, the real action happens in the surrounding desert. Quad-biking, sand-boarding and other guided adrenaline inducing activities are available. At Walvis Bay join a dolphin cruise or explore the designated lagoon with its rich birdlife including migratory Greater and Lesser Flamingos. The reed-fringed lagoon at Sandwich Harbour, 48kms south of Walvis Bay at the foot of towering ivory-coloured dunes, is a spectacular and photo worthy destination.
 
 
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Erongo Region - Damaraland - Brandberg - Twyfelfontein
The name Damaraland is derived from the fact that the Damara people live in this area. The name Damaraland is still commonly used in tourism circles, although the entire region has now been renamed; the southern section now lies in the Erongo region while the north forms part of the Kunene region. The highlight of the region is Twyfelfontein, also known as /Ui-//ais, is a World Heritage site with one of the largest concentrations of rock engravings (petroglyphs) in Africa. Over 2,500 engravings over 2,000 years old are set on a stunning hillside amongst red sandstone boulders. Guides take visitors to view the amazing engravings including elephants, lion, giraffe and kudu and many more. Other special attractions are the majestic Brandberg with its treasure trove of ancient Bushman rock art, the Petrified Forest, Burnt Mountain, Organ Pipes, the "Vingerklippe",the Spitzkoppe and the Erongo Mountains. Incorporating the Erongo Mountains and western escarpment, the Erongo Mountain Conservancy extends over 200 000 hectares, encompassing one of the most environmentally diverse areas in Namibia, and including cultural artefacts such as rock paintings, rock engravings and prehistoric settlements.
 
 
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Etosha National Park
Etosha National Park is one of the best and most famous wildlife sanctuaries in Africa. Etosha owes its unique landscape to the Etosha Pan, a vast shallow depression of approximately 5000km² which form the heart of the park. Once part of a large inland lake fed by rivers from the north and east, it dried up 120 million years ago as continental drift changed the slope of the land and the course of the tributaries. It was proclaimed a game reserve in 1907 and in total covers an area of over 22,000km². The heart of the park is the Etosha Pan, meaning "great white water", an extensive, flat depression of about 5000km². This vast, white expanse is a place of shimmering images and mirage, and viewing the game in this unique setting makes Etosha an unforgettable experience. A series of waterholes along the southern edge of the pan guarantee rewarding and often spectacular game viewing. If the area gets heavy rain the bed still fills and becomes a popular place for thousands of wading birds, including flamingos. Normally however the big attraction of the area to the wildlife are the springs that run round the edge of the pan.
 
 
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Otjozondjupa Region - Waterberg - Hoba Meteorite - Otjikoto Region (Oshikoto) - Tsumeb
The Waterberg Plateau is a relatively inaccessible spot in the central highland area of Namibia not far from the town of Otjiwarongo. The plateau was the site of the decisive battle between the Herero and German colonial forces but today is a national park that is the home to many rare and endangered animals including leopard and roan and sable antelope. The park also has great hiking trails with spectacular views. Rising approx. 200 meters above the surrounding African Bush and Savannah, the Waterberg Plateau with its flamboyant brick-red sandstone formations and lush green vegetation presents an island of vibrant color. Morning hikes to the Waterberg Plateau are a favourite, and their guide will be able to show the fresh scent of leopard, rhino, buffalo and various antelope. Once on top of the plateau, hikers can enjoy the spectacular views of the fertile valley of the wilderness and across the Omaheke (or Sandveld.) The Hoba meteorite near Grootfontein is the largest intact meteorite in the world,was discovered by farmer Jacobus Hermanus Brits in 1920. The meteorite weights approximately 60 tons and has a measures 2.95 by 2.84 meters. Not only the size and its weight that makes this single largest known meteorite in the world so unique but also its cuboid shape which is highly unusual amongst meteorites. It was declared a national monument in March 1955 but despite the fact still suffered from vandals over the years. The estimated age of meteorite is between 200 and 400 million years and it fell on Earth approximately 80 000 years ago. The meteorite consists of 82.4% iron, 16.4% nickel and 0.76% cobalt. Tsumeb is seen as "The gateway to the North" of Namibia. It is the closest town to the Etosha National Park, one of the greatest reserves for wildlife in all of Africa. The Tsumeb mine is renowned amongst mineral collectors. Economically Tsumeb is and has always been primarily a mining town. Copper, lead, silver, gold, arsenic zinc and germanium were found in the huge mineralized pipe. Many millions of tonnes of ore of spectacular grade were removed. A good percentage of the ore (called "direct smelting ore") was so rich that it was sent straight to the smelter situated near the town without first having to be processed through the mineral enrichment plant. The mine was originally owned by the OMEG (Otavi Minen und Eisenbahn Gesellschaft) and later by TCL (Tsumeb Corporation Limited) before its closure a few years ago, when the ore at depth ran out. The Living Museum of the Ju/'Hoansi-San is the first Living Museum of Namibia. It is a cultural highlight in Namibia as well as a good example for a sustainable development. The Living Museum is an authentic open-air museum where guests can learn a lot about the traditional culture and the original way of living of the San. The Ju/'Hoansi bushmen demonstrate and describe everything with great dedication and the guide translates into english. Almost every offered programm is interactive, because it is also great fun for the Ju/'Hoansi when the visitors try to shoot an arrow, experience the special Ju/'Hoansi rope skipping or try to sing a an original song. Lake Otjikoto lies some 20 km W-NW of Tsumeb along the main road to Ondangwa and Namutoni. The lake was known to the San under the name Gaisis ("ugly"). When the Herero moved into the area, they named it Otjikoto (Otjiherero: "deep hole"). „Otjikoto“ is the Herero word for „deep water“, and is in fact a collapsed sinkhole in dolomites of the Neoproterozoic Maieberg Formation of the Damara Sequence. It’s location possibly has some structural control, as a magnetic anomaly passes adjacent to the lake. Lake Guinas is also located in bedded dolomites with associated structural control. It is larger than Lake Otjikoto, having a maximum diameter of 140 m and a depth of 153 m. During World War I German troops dumped artillery and other war materials in the lake before surrendering to the South African and British troops. Most of the larger pieces have been recovered and are displayed in Museums. Lake Guinas is the larger of only two permanent natural lakes in Namibia. It is a sinkhole lake, created by a collapsing karst cave; it is located thirty two kilometres north of Tsumeb, near the D3043 road.
 
 
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Kunene Region - Torra Conservancy - Damaraland - Kaokoland / Kaokoveld - Kunene River - Epupa - Himba
Kaokoland extends from the Kunene southwards across a sparsely populated environment down to the Hoanib River. Attractions in this region include the desert-adapted elephants, the Epupa Falls, Marienfluss, Hartmann Valley, the beautiful Khowarib Schlucht and Witbooisdrift. Himba pastoralists live in the Kaokoland, an extensive territory in northwest Namibia bordering Angola in the north along Kunene river. The Atlantic Ocean and the Skeleton coast form its Western boundary. The Himba live in small villages that usually accommodate one large family. The women are noted for their unusual sculptural beauty, enhanced by intricate hairstyles and traditional adornments. They rub their bodies with red ochre and fat. The homes of the Himba of Kaokoland are simple, cone-shaped structures of saplings, bound together with palm leaves and plastered with mud and dung. The Epupa Falls are located in the Kunene River in Northern Namibia, approximately 150 km downstream from the Ruacana Falls. The river is 0.5 km wide just before the falls and drops in a series of 35 main waterfalls spread over 1.5 km, with the greatest single drop being 37 m. The name "Epupa" is a Herero word for "foam", referring to the foam created by the falling water. The Ruacana Falls are located near the town of Ruacana in the Kunene River. The waterfall is 120 meters (390 ft) high and 700 meters (2,300 ft) wide, when the Kunene river is in full flood. During the dry season, most of the water is channeled through the hidden turbines of the hydroelectric power station and thus bypasses the falls. The falls could be completely without water at some times during the year.
 
 
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Kavango Region - Zambezi Region - Caprivi
The Kavango and Zambezi (former Caprivi) regions extend from the northern Kalahari Sandveld biome where the Khaudom National Park conserves this densely wooded wilderness, up to Namibia's north-eastern region where the landscape and environment become typically African. Here perennial rivers and expansive floodplains, lush tropical vegetation, an abundance of game and birds, and scattered settlements of rural people provide a complete change of scenery from the vast dune seas of the Namib, the long linear dunes of the Kalahari, the rugged and sparsely populated Damaraland and the panoramic vistas and distant mountain ranges of the deep south of Namibia. Sunset river cruises on pontoons, photo safaris, swamp safaris, boating, a trip in a mukoro (dug-out canoe) and game viewing, either on foot or in open 4x4 vehicles, are activities sought-after by holidaymakers in this region. But due to the remote location and the extreme distance from virtually any bigger city within Southern Africa, make this stretch of land still mostly untouched and wild. Here you can still find large herds of elephant, the endangered roan antelope, buffaloes, hippos, crocodiles and many other types of antelopes and wildlife together with an astounding variety of bird life. The tourism infrastructure is still very limited, which also makes it a great get-away destination. Bwabwata National Park Wedged between Angola and Botswana, Bwabwata extends for about 180 km’s from the Okavango River in the West to the Kwando River in the East and forms a trans-boundary link for wildlife migration between Angola, Botswana, Namibia and Zambia. Bwabwata’s landscape is generally flat, except for sporadic 30-60metre high dunes covered in vegetation. Deciduous woodlands are dominated by trees such as wild seringa, copalwood, Zambezi teak, wild teak and several bushwillow species. The park is sanctuary to many bird and wildlife species including elephants, buffalo, hippopotamus, roan, sable, tsessebe, zebra, wildebeest, reedbuck, red lechwe, and crocodile and the main predators in the park are lion, leopard, cheetah and spotted hyena. Mamili National Park Mamili National Park has the distinction of being the largest wetland area with conservation status in Namibia. A paradise of watery channels, reed islands and beautiful wetlands, it is undoubtedly a must see for visitors to the area. Nestled along the curve of the Kwando River, Mamili is a haven for birds and other animals. The vegetation is dominated by species associated with floodplains and it is these floodplains that provide the ideal protection for swamp and floodplain mammals such as the sitatunga, red lechwe, buffalo and wild dog and is also home to elephant, lion, giraffe, crocodile, hippo, puku and otters. Mudumu National Park Mudumu is a vast expanse of dense savannah and mopane woodlands with the Kwando River as its western border. South of Lianshulu the river breaks up into a labyrinth of channels to form the Linyanti swamp. The park is home to small populations of sitatunga and red lechwe while the spotted-necked otter, hippo and crocodile inhabit the waterways. During a game drive, animals that are likely to be encountered are elephant, buffalo, roan antelope, kudu, impala and zebra and there is always a chance of seeing some of the fiercer predators.
 
 
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Skeleton Coast National Park
The Skeleton Coast National Park, proclaimed int its present form in 1971, covers an area of 16 845 km² and protects about one third of Namibia's coastline. The landscape in the park ranges from sweeping vistas of windswept dunes to rugged canyons with walls of richly colored volcanic rock and extensive mountain ranges. The Skeleton Coast National Park, arguably the least visited national park in the world, is part of the Iona – Skeleton Coast Transfrontier Conservation Area. Despite its barren image, the Skeleton Coast is rich in wildlife. Elephants, Giraffes, and Lions roam the interior, while the coast itself boast an impressive colony of Cape Fur seal. The northern section of the Skeleton Coast Park is a tourism concession area and restricted to Fly-In Safaris only. The southern section between the Ugab and Hoanib rivers is accessible to the general public staying at Terrace Bay and Torra Bay. The flat and open beaches of the coastline, which are often shrouded in mist, are home to numerous Cape fur seal colonies, which in turn provide food for black-backed jackals and the rare brown hyaena.
 
 
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Omaheke Region - Gobabis - Trans Kalahari Highway - Kalahari Desert
The Kalahari Desert stretches over seven different countries in southern Africa. The Kgalagadi, as it is known in Botswana and South Africa - covers the western part of Namibia, a large part of Botswana, and north-western South Africa north of the Orange River. The Kalahari Desert stretches across endless plains and paints the landscape in rusty reds, golden yellows and splatters of green. It's coverage in Namibia is called a ‘desert' principally because it's porous, sandy soils cannot retain surface water, but in some areas annual rainfall can be as high as 250mm, which accounts for the luxuriant grass cover during good years. The Kalahari Desert presents the vivid aspect of its Red Sands and of the eye-calming green of its Acacias. The Trans-Kalahari Corridor is a paved highway corridor that provides a direct route from Walvis Bay and Windhoek in central Namibia, through Botswana, to Johannesburg and Pretoria in Gauteng province in South Africa. The corridor also includes railway lines from Walvis Bay as far as Gobabis in Namibia, and from Johannesburg as far as Lobatse in Botswana. Gobabis is a town situated 200 kilometers east from Windhoek, the capital city and on the route to Botswana (Gobabis is about 110 km to/from the Buitepos Border post with Botswana - Mamuno Border). Gobabis lies in the heart of the Omaheke Region best known as the cattle country (farming area), and it is the capital of the east or Omaheke Region and also known as the “Little Texas” of Namibia. In fact Gobabis is so proud of it's cattle farming that a statue of a large bull with the enscription 'Welcome to Cattle Country' greets visitors to the town.
 
 
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